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What to Look Out For When Receiving Phishing Emails

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Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 

There are warning signs you can look for to avoid being a victim of a phishing email. Phishing emails are deceptively disguised attempts to obtain our personal information.

 

When it comes to phishing emails, cybercriminals are becoming increasingly sophisticated. They will personalize them to make you feel as if you need to know where this is coming from, or they will entice you to open attachments or click on hyperlinks. We must remain vigilant, especially in light of the ongoing global crisis.

 
Posted : 10/09/2021 12:21 pm
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 

1. SUBJECT LINE AND SENDER INFORMATION:

When you open an email, the sender information and subject line are the first things you see. Consider the following questions:

  • Do you recognize either of them? Is either of these misspelled?
  • Is this the email you expected? Is there a sense of urgency in the subject line?
  • Is the email a response or a forward to something you never asked for?
  • If you notice misspellings or unusual text, consider it a red flag.
  • If you don't recognize the sender and weren't expecting it, it's best to mark the email as spam or delete it.
 
Posted : 10/09/2021 12:22 pm
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 

2. THE body of the email:

If the email did not raise any of the red flags mentioned above and you decided to open it, there are additional signs to look out for in the email's body that may indicate fraud.

  • A common denominator is poor grammar and spelling.
  • Continue to be on the lookout for any signs of impending doom or a request for documents that you were not expecting.
  • If you are asked to click, download, or open an attachment or link, proceed with caution. If it's a promotional offer that appears to be too good to be true, it probably is. If you are unsure or feel uncomfortable, it is best to delete it or mark it as spam.
 
Posted : 10/09/2021 12:23 pm
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 

3. HYPERLINKS AND ATTACHMENTS:

Do not open the attachment if you do not recognize the sender, if the file type appears unfamiliar, or if the title of the attachment is unfamiliar or unexpected. To avoid clicking on a fraudulent hyperlink, hover your mouse over it (do not click, just hover) and do not click if the link address displayed differs from the one in the email. That is a huge red flag.

 

A misspelling within the hyperlink is another red flag. For example, the extra “o” in https://gooogle.com could easily be overlooked, leading you to believe you are on the correct website. Be cautious and double-check everything before proceeding!

 
Posted : 10/09/2021 12:23 pm
Muhammad aown
(@muhammad-aown)
Posts: 6735
Member Customer
 

Brother are phishing emails those kind of emails which appear as they are taking our survey? I mean brother am I right if I think that surveys and phising emails are made for same purpose?

 
Posted : 16/09/2021 12:07 pm
Muhammad aown
(@muhammad-aown)
Posts: 6735
Member Customer
 
Posted by: @retrocanvas

1. SUBJECT LINE AND SENDER INFORMATION:

When you open an email, the sender information and subject line are the first things you see. Consider the following questions:

  • Do you recognize either of them? Is either of these misspelled?
  • Is this the email you expected? Is there a sense of urgency in the subject line?
  • Is the email a response or a forward to something you never asked for?
  • If you notice misspellings or unusual text, consider it a red flag.
  • If you don't recognize the sender and weren't expecting it, it's best to mark the email as spam or delete it.

Brother you are uploading mini articles one by one under a single forum topic, brother it's better that you make saperate post for saperate mini article or combine all the articles in one article so it looks more organised to forum members.

 
Posted : 16/09/2021 12:08 pm
Muhammad aown
(@muhammad-aown)
Posts: 6735
Member Customer
 
Posted by: @retrocanvas

2. THE body of the email:

If the email did not raise any of the red flags mentioned above and you decided to open it, there are additional signs to look out for in the email's body that may indicate fraud.

  • A common denominator is poor grammar and spelling.
  • Continue to be on the lookout for any signs of impending doom or a request for documents that you were not expecting.
  • If you are asked to click, download, or open an attachment or link, proceed with caution. If it's a promotional offer that appears to be too good to be true, it probably is. If you are unsure or feel uncomfortable, it is best to delete it or mark it as spam.

Brother it's simple if a person whom we trust asks us through email to do a particular task, there are good amount of chances we might do it however if a person which we don't know or don't trust we know them for a short period of time asks us to do the same as a person we trust asked us through email, we might not do it.

 
Posted : 16/09/2021 12:10 pm
peter.a.edwards
(@peter-a-edwards)
Posts: 16
Member Customer
 
Posted by: @retrocanvas

1. SUBJECT LINE AND SENDER INFORMATION:

When you open an email, the sender information and subject line are the first things you see. Consider the following questions:

  • Do you recognize either of them? Is either of these misspelled?
  • Is this the email you expected? Is there a sense of urgency in the subject line?
  • Is the email a response or a forward to something you never asked for?
  • If you notice misspellings or unusual text, consider it a red flag.
  • If you don't recognize the sender and weren't expecting it, it's best to mark the email as spam or delete it.

This is correct and some of the signs, other things to look for are does the email look like someone you have had mail from before, as in "Hover over the sender's link do not click" 

Does the email address look like an email address you know?

Sometimes what can look like a sender you know is fake. Do not open attachments that your not expecting.

Scan emails before opening messages, it is the clicking open of the mail that can activate it as it could be a virus.

Will you send me the following.

Name:

Address:

Phone Number:

ID:

DOB:

These signs are RED FLAGS

Having spam filters, scanner and anti-malware protection is a step in the right direction.

Be vigilant and mark mail as phishing when it looks fake.

 

 

 
Posted : 16/09/2021 2:43 pm
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 
Posted by: @peter-a-edwards
Posted by: @retrocanvas

1. SUBJECT LINE AND SENDER INFORMATION:

When you open an email, the sender information and subject line are the first things you see. Consider the following questions:

  • Do you recognize either of them? Is either of these misspelled?
  • Is this the email you expected? Is there a sense of urgency in the subject line?
  • Is the email a response or a forward to something you never asked for?
  • If you notice misspellings or unusual text, consider it a red flag.
  • If you don't recognize the sender and weren't expecting it, it's best to mark the email as spam or delete it.

This is correct and some of the signs, other things to look for are does the email look like someone you have had mail from before, as in "Hover over the sender's link do not click" 

Does the email address look like an email address you know?

Sometimes what can look like a sender you know is fake. Do not open attachments that your not expecting.

Scan emails before opening messages, it is the clicking open of the mail that can activate it as it could be a virus.

Will you send me the following.

Name:

Address:

Phone Number:

ID:

DOB:

These signs are RED FLAGS

Having spam filters, scanner and anti-malware protection is a step in the right direction.

Be vigilant and mark mail as phishing when it looks fake.

 

 

Very helpful tips you have added brother! Thank you for elaborating the topic further.

 
Posted : 20/09/2021 7:22 pm
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 
Posted by: @muhammad-aown
Posted by: @retrocanvas

2. THE body of the email:

If the email did not raise any of the red flags mentioned above and you decided to open it, there are additional signs to look out for in the email's body that may indicate fraud.

  • A common denominator is poor grammar and spelling.
  • Continue to be on the lookout for any signs of impending doom or a request for documents that you were not expecting.
  • If you are asked to click, download, or open an attachment or link, proceed with caution. If it's a promotional offer that appears to be too good to be true, it probably is. If you are unsure or feel uncomfortable, it is best to delete it or mark it as spam.

Brother it's simple if a person whom we trust asks us through email to do a particular task, there are good amount of chances we might do it however if a person which we don't know or don't trust we know them for a short period of time asks us to do the same as a person we trust asked us through email, we might not do it.

Sometimes people you trust or know might be hacked, and the hacker might send bogus links from their account. 

 
Posted : 20/09/2021 7:24 pm
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 
Posted by: @muhammad-aown
Posted by: @retrocanvas

1. SUBJECT LINE AND SENDER INFORMATION:

When you open an email, the sender information and subject line are the first things you see. Consider the following questions:

  • Do you recognize either of them? Is either of these misspelled?
  • Is this the email you expected? Is there a sense of urgency in the subject line?
  • Is the email a response or a forward to something you never asked for?
  • If you notice misspellings or unusual text, consider it a red flag.
  • If you don't recognize the sender and weren't expecting it, it's best to mark the email as spam or delete it.

Brother you are uploading mini articles one by one under a single forum topic, brother it's better that you make saperate post for saperate mini article or combine all the articles in one article so it looks more organised to forum members.

They are the same topics but different important point. Putting them all together might make them lengthy 

 
Posted : 20/09/2021 7:25 pm
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 
Posted by: @muhammad-aown

Brother are phishing emails those kind of emails which appear as they are taking our survey? I mean brother am I right if I think that surveys and phising emails are made for same purpose?

Phishing emails are from Scammers and Hackers and are made to trick users into revealing things such as their Usernames, passwords, Otp codes etc.

 

Links in Surveys might be legitimate but they may also be phishing emails especially if you keep getting redirected to manu pages with lots of free gifts that are impossible to win

 
Posted : 20/09/2021 7:28 pm
Waleed Shafiq
(@waleedshafiq99)
Posts: 7625
Member Customer
 
Posted by: @retrocanvas
Posted by: @muhammad-aown

Brother are phishing emails those kind of emails which appear as they are taking our survey? I mean brother am I right if I think that surveys and phising emails are made for same purpose?

Phishing emails are from Scammers and Hackers and are made to trick users into revealing things such as their Usernames, passwords, Otp codes etc.

 

Links in Surveys might be legitimate but they may also be phishing emails especially if you keep getting redirected to manu pages with lots of free gifts that are impossible to win

We have to stay away from these types of emails because they can also hack our personal information and if they succeed in this then we can not think how much misuse they can do with our information. 

 
Posted : 29/11/2021 6:24 am
Waleed Shafiq
(@waleedshafiq99)
Posts: 7625
Member Customer
 
Posted by: @retrocanvas
Posted by: @muhammad-aown
Posted by: @retrocanvas

1. SUBJECT LINE AND SENDER INFORMATION:

When you open an email, the sender information and subject line are the first things you see. Consider the following questions:

  • Do you recognize either of them? Is either of these misspelled?
  • Is this the email you expected? Is there a sense of urgency in the subject line?
  • Is the email a response or a forward to something you never asked for?
  • If you notice misspellings or unusual text, consider it a red flag.
  • If you don't recognize the sender and weren't expecting it, it's best to mark the email as spam or delete it.

Brother you are uploading mini articles one by one under a single forum topic, brother it's better that you make saperate post for saperate mini article or combine all the articles in one article so it looks more organised to forum members.

They are the same topics but different important point. Putting them all together might make them lengthy 

It does not matter if it will become easy to understand more clearly, even if it becomes lengthy. 

 
Posted : 29/11/2021 6:26 am
Waleed Shafiq
(@waleedshafiq99)
Posts: 7625
Member Customer
 
Posted by: @retrocanvas
Posted by: @muhammad-aown
Posted by: @retrocanvas

2. THE body of the email:

If the email did not raise any of the red flags mentioned above and you decided to open it, there are additional signs to look out for in the email's body that may indicate fraud.

  • A common denominator is poor grammar and spelling.
  • Continue to be on the lookout for any signs of impending doom or a request for documents that you were not expecting.
  • If you are asked to click, download, or open an attachment or link, proceed with caution. If it's a promotional offer that appears to be too good to be true, it probably is. If you are unsure or feel uncomfortable, it is best to delete it or mark it as spam.

Brother it's simple if a person whom we trust asks us through email to do a particular task, there are good amount of chances we might do it however if a person which we don't know or don't trust we know them for a short period of time asks us to do the same as a person we trust asked us through email, we might not do it.

Sometimes people you trust or know might be hacked, and the hacker might send bogus links from their account. 

Exactly. And we will not get the idea that we will be hacked. 

 
Posted : 29/11/2021 6:27 am
Waleed Shafiq
(@waleedshafiq99)
Posts: 7625
Member Customer
 
Posted by: @retrocanvas
Posted by: @peter-a-edwards
Posted by: @retrocanvas

1. SUBJECT LINE AND SENDER INFORMATION:

When you open an email, the sender information and subject line are the first things you see. Consider the following questions:

  • Do you recognize either of them? Is either of these misspelled?
  • Is this the email you expected? Is there a sense of urgency in the subject line?
  • Is the email a response or a forward to something you never asked for?
  • If you notice misspellings or unusual text, consider it a red flag.
  • If you don't recognize the sender and weren't expecting it, it's best to mark the email as spam or delete it.

This is correct and some of the signs, other things to look for are does the email look like someone you have had mail from before, as in "Hover over the sender's link do not click" 

Does the email address look like an email address you know?

Sometimes what can look like a sender you know is fake. Do not open attachments that your not expecting.

Scan emails before opening messages, it is the clicking open of the mail that can activate it as it could be a virus.

Will you send me the following.

Name:

Address:

Phone Number:

ID:

DOB:

These signs are RED FLAGS

Having spam filters, scanner and anti-malware protection is a step in the right direction.

Be vigilant and mark mail as phishing when it looks fake.

 

 

Very helpful tips you have added brother! Thank you for elaborating the topic further.

Yeah, he definitely gives his best and I like that. ???? 

 
Posted : 29/11/2021 6:28 am
Retro Canvas reacted
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 
Posted by: @waleedshafiq99
Posted by: @retrocanvas
Posted by: @peter-a-edwards
Posted by: @retrocanvas

1. SUBJECT LINE AND SENDER INFORMATION:

When you open an email, the sender information and subject line are the first things you see. Consider the following questions:

  • Do you recognize either of them? Is either of these misspelled?
  • Is this the email you expected? Is there a sense of urgency in the subject line?
  • Is the email a response or a forward to something you never asked for?
  • If you notice misspellings or unusual text, consider it a red flag.
  • If you don't recognize the sender and weren't expecting it, it's best to mark the email as spam or delete it.

This is correct and some of the signs, other things to look for are does the email look like someone you have had mail from before, as in "Hover over the sender's link do not click" 

Does the email address look like an email address you know?

Sometimes what can look like a sender you know is fake. Do not open attachments that your not expecting.

Scan emails before opening messages, it is the clicking open of the mail that can activate it as it could be a virus.

Will you send me the following.

Name:

Address:

Phone Number:

ID:

DOB:

These signs are RED FLAGS

Having spam filters, scanner and anti-malware protection is a step in the right direction.

Be vigilant and mark mail as phishing when it looks fake.

 

 

Very helpful tips you have added brother! Thank you for elaborating the topic further.

Yeah, he definitely gives his best and I like that. ???? 

I really appreciate brother

 
Posted : 29/11/2021 10:15 am
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 
Posted by: @waleedshafiq99
Posted by: @retrocanvas
Posted by: @muhammad-aown
Posted by: @retrocanvas

2. THE body of the email:

If the email did not raise any of the red flags mentioned above and you decided to open it, there are additional signs to look out for in the email's body that may indicate fraud.

  • A common denominator is poor grammar and spelling.
  • Continue to be on the lookout for any signs of impending doom or a request for documents that you were not expecting.
  • If you are asked to click, download, or open an attachment or link, proceed with caution. If it's a promotional offer that appears to be too good to be true, it probably is. If you are unsure or feel uncomfortable, it is best to delete it or mark it as spam.

Brother it's simple if a person whom we trust asks us through email to do a particular task, there are good amount of chances we might do it however if a person which we don't know or don't trust we know them for a short period of time asks us to do the same as a person we trust asked us through email, we might not do it.

Sometimes people you trust or know might be hacked, and the hacker might send bogus links from their account. 

Exactly. And we will not get the idea that we will be hacked. 

Exactly, because we trust them

 
Posted : 29/11/2021 10:15 am
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 
Posted by: @waleedshafiq99
Posted by: @retrocanvas
Posted by: @muhammad-aown
Posted by: @retrocanvas

1. SUBJECT LINE AND SENDER INFORMATION:

When you open an email, the sender information and subject line are the first things you see. Consider the following questions:

  • Do you recognize either of them? Is either of these misspelled?
  • Is this the email you expected? Is there a sense of urgency in the subject line?
  • Is the email a response or a forward to something you never asked for?
  • If you notice misspellings or unusual text, consider it a red flag.
  • If you don't recognize the sender and weren't expecting it, it's best to mark the email as spam or delete it.

Brother you are uploading mini articles one by one under a single forum topic, brother it's better that you make saperate post for saperate mini article or combine all the articles in one article so it looks more organised to forum members.

They are the same topics but different important point. Putting them all together might make them lengthy 

It does not matter if it will become easy to understand more clearly, even if it becomes lengthy. 

Okay, I will consider that

 
Posted : 29/11/2021 10:16 am
Retro Canvas
(@retrocanvas)
Posts: 3167
Member Customer
Topic starter
 
Posted by: @waleedshafiq99
Posted by: @retrocanvas
Posted by: @muhammad-aown

Brother are phishing emails those kind of emails which appear as they are taking our survey? I mean brother am I right if I think that surveys and phising emails are made for same purpose?

Phishing emails are from Scammers and Hackers and are made to trick users into revealing things such as their Usernames, passwords, Otp codes etc.

 

Links in Surveys might be legitimate but they may also be phishing emails especially if you keep getting redirected to manu pages with lots of free gifts that are impossible to win

We have to stay away from these types of emails because they can also hack our personal information and if they succeed in this then we can not think how much misuse they can do with our information. 

Most importantly, we need to know how to detect them

 
Posted : 29/11/2021 10:18 am
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